Recent Changes

Sunday, July 23

  1. page Sundin 2017 ASTR edited ... in Performance: Jos José Luis Gómez Bridget Sundin ABSTRACT:

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    in Performance: JosJosé Luis Gómez
    Bridget Sundin
    ABSTRACT:
    (view changes)
    10:04 am
  2. page Sundin 2017 ASTR edited La Celestina in Performance: Jos Luis Gómez and the Extra/Ordinary (Fe)Male Body Bridget Sundin…

    La Celestina in Performance: Jos Luis Gómez and the Extra/Ordinary (Fe)Male Body
    Bridget Sundin
    ABSTRACT:
    The Croxton Play of the Sacrament is (nominally) set in Spain and features early representations of Spanish Jews, some of whom are presented as monstrous -- their attempts to harm a consecrated loaf of Eucharistic bread turns into literal physical attacks of Christ, who just as horrifically appears burnt and bleeding from an oven. Part of this paper deals with how Jews, often thought of as being ordinary in Spain, were far more extraordinary in England and how that extraordinary nature is revealed as monstrous.
    WORKING PAPER:

    (view changes)
    10:03 am
  3. page Sundin 2017 ASTR edited La Celestina in Performance: Jos Luis Gmez and the Extra/Ordinary (Fe)Male Body Bridget Sundin …

    La Celestina in Performance: Jos Luis Gmez and the Extra/Ordinary (Fe)Male Body
    Bridget Sundin
    ABSTRACT:
    The Croxton Play of the Sacrament is (nominally) set in Spain and features early representations of Spanish Jews, some of whom are presented as monstrous -- their attempts to harm a consecrated loaf of Eucharistic bread turns into literal physical attacks of Christ, who just as horrifically appears burnt and bleeding from an oven. Part of this paper deals with how Jews, often thought of as being ordinary in Spain, were far more extraordinary in England and how that extraordinary nature is revealed as monstrous.
    WORKING PAPER:

    (view changes)
    10:02 am
  4. page Paun de Garcia 2017 ASTR edited ... Susan Paun de García ABSTRACT: ... social debates. WORKING PAPER:
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    Susan Paun de García
    ABSTRACT:
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    social debates.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    10:02 am
  5. page Erdman 2017 ASTR edited ... Harley Erdman ABSTRACT: ... adaptation choices. WORKING PAPER:
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    Harley Erdman
    ABSTRACT:
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    adaptation choices.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    10:00 am
  6. page Sundin 2017 ASTR edited ... Bridget Sundin ABSTRACT: The Croxton Play of the Sacrament is (nominally) set in Spain and …
    ...
    Bridget Sundin
    ABSTRACT:
    The Croxton Play of the Sacrament is (nominally) set in Spain and features early representations of Spanish Jews, some of whom are presented as monstrous -- their attempts to harm a consecrated loaf of Eucharistic bread turns into literal physical attacks of Christ, who just as horrifically appears burnt and bleeding from an oven. Part of this paper deals with how Jews, often thought of as being ordinary in Spain, were far more extraordinary in England and how that extraordinary nature is revealed as monstrous.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    9:59 am
  7. page Paun de Garcia 2017 ASTR edited ... Susan Paun de García ABSTRACT: Witchcraft, magic, and the occult were deeply embedded in ea…
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    Susan Paun de García
    ABSTRACT:
    Witchcraft, magic, and the occult were deeply embedded in early modern European culture, both popular and elite. As historians have shown, from an examination of the accounts of demonic possession and of the treatises on demonology we can learn much about both popular beliefs and elite preoccupations. The genre of the magic play (comedia de magia) provides a context that displays these beliefs, and in some of José de Cañizares’s plays, intimations of the “modern” woman as well. In El asombro de Francia, Marta la Romarantina, at issue is a conflict between good and evil, where the primary place of contention is the protagonist herself. Marta’s personal struggles have broad societal implications: freedom of action and thought, as well as independence and autonomy, which are in conflict with the hierarchical structure and customs of society. The play invites not merely a critical examination of the status quo but possibly even action to change it. In this examination of Marta la Romarantina, In discussing several aspects of the play, I will focus chiefly on the sensuality of possession—in its manifestation and its performance in psychological and theatrical contexts—and its relation and similarity to hysteria. Nevertheless, it is impossible to ignore importance of the voice: the conflicting performative utterances of cursing and exorcism, which involve voice and ventriloquism. As well, the post-modern audience of readers will hear various voices in the play that sound very much like some from our own social debates.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    9:58 am
  8. page Gunter 2017 ASTR edited ... Ben Gunter ABSTRACT: I work with a tiny, intense troupe called Theater with a Mission. We c…
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    Ben Gunter
    ABSTRACT:
    I work with a tiny, intense troupe called Theater with a Mission. We connect plays from the Spanish Golden Age with milestones in Florida history, to remind people that Florida has spent more time under Spanish-speaking governance than under English-speaking governance, and to lure people into thinking about what that means. In 2013, we translated Lope de Vega's "Nuevo mundo" into "Lope's (small) New World." We were fascinated by the fact that the first play every written to dramatize life in the New World based its Native American characters on names, stories, and Columbian exchanges that had been recorded by European visitors to La Florida. Three monsters captured our imaginations: > a man-eater ... not the carnivorous fish alluded to in act one, nor the cannibalistic welcome feast suggested offstage in act two, but the displaced queen-elect Tacuana, who figuratively eats a Spanish trader alive in act three; > a double-header ... an unspeakably alien thing that the Spanish unload out of the belly of a caravel, as reported in a riddle by Native American narrator Tecue; and > a succu/incu/bus ... the spirit who resists Colon's right to sail West before the court of Providencia in act one, and who resurfaces as the demon-god Ongol in act three, sucking the soul out of cacique Dulcanquellin to make mischief between the natives and the newcomers. In 2013, during the 500th anniversary of official contact between Spain and La Florida, we found these monsters instructive and redemptive, skilfully crafted examples of a playwright's power to lure audience members into looking at the world through alien eyes. In 2017, we're preparing to revive "Lope's (small) New World" for the 200th anniversary of Florida changing hands, from Spanish "provincia" to US Territory. How will our actors and our audiences make sense of these monsters now? In today's toxic policital climate, interpreting an anniversary that foregrounds Hispanic disempowerment, will Tacuana's man-eating, Tecue's creature-riddling, and Ongol's designs on Dulcan's soul take on darker colors, paint them how we will? Using case studies from test performances, this paper puzzles out some provisional answers to these questions.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    9:57 am
  9. page Erdman 2017 ASTR edited ... Harley Erdman ABSTRACT: Luis Vélez de Guevara’s La serrana de la Vera (1613) has generated …
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    Harley Erdman
    ABSTRACT:
    Luis Vélez de Guevara’s La serrana de la Vera (1613) has generated a lot of critical interest recently – and one major stage production – because of its extraordinarily non-normative protagonist, Gila, who identifies as a man and behaves as one, while undertaking uncommon feats of strength, heroism, and violence. She has been variously identified over the years as “irregular,” homosexual, lesbian, queer, and, most recently, by Harrison Meadows at the 2016 ASTR conference, as transgender. In this paper, I will argue that the play also includes another extraordinary body: Captain Don Lucas de Carvajal, her seducer and aggressor, who textually and contextually can be specified as Jewish. His non-normative masculinity can be paired with Gila’s non-normative femininity in a way that generates a richer and more complicated understanding of this tragedy, thus differentiating it from other “rural honor” plays like Lope de Vega’s Fuente Ovejuna or Peribáñez. As the first translator of this play into English, I will also pose how this perspective affects translation choices and, in consequence, potential staging and adaptation choices.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    9:55 am
  10. page Grubbs 2017 ASTR edited ... Anthony Grubbs ABSTRACT: St. Christopher is traditionally known as a Canaanite giant, in so…
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    Anthony Grubbs
    ABSTRACT:
    St. Christopher is traditionally known as a Canaanite giant, in some instances, cynocephalic, who, in the third century AD, converts to Christianity, evangelizes in foreign lands, and is martyred by the Roman emperor Decius. As the patron saint of travelers, his cult expanded to enormous proportions throughout early modern Europe. While his remarkable deeds spurred canonization, his gigantic stature and horrendous visage make him stand out among other saints. St. Christopher' s monstrous appearance is highlighted not only in martyrologies, but also in the religious and secular theater dealing with his life and death. In this paper, I discuss the 300-year transformation of St. Christopher' s physical representation starting with the religious processions of Aragon and continuing in the corpus of theater dedicated to the saint (7 works: 1 mystery play, 2 consuetas, 1 auto, and 3 comedias). The most evident changes began after the Council of Trent, when patent attempts to humanize the saint became the norm. This was especially true in the comedias, where we see distinctive portrayals of the protagonist, but attempts to conform to the status quo came at a price. Indeed, St. Christopher s transition from extraordinary to ordinary caused tension between ecclesiastical mandates dealing with the portrayal of saints and the public' s desire for novelty.
    WORKING PAPER:
    (view changes)
    9:45 am

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